The couple has been married for 11 years, and previously blended into more diverse communities like Chicago's Pullman neighborhood and Oak Park.

They lived in Virginia, one of the states that still banned “miscegenation” – the derogatory term used to describe interracial coupling – so they needed to travel to the District of Columbia to be officially recognized as a couple.

They were married in “Whiteness.” Although the couple initially pled guilty, they later decided to dispute the law, and took their fight all the way to the Supreme Court.

But he also said he thinks that "a large portion of the country has gotten over that and as long as you love each other and are not doing it because you're fetishizing interracial relationships or not doing it because you think it's going to help you politically or socially, no one cares," he said.

Among the study's other findings:•Black men are twice as likely to intermarry as black women, while Asian women are much more likely to do so than Asian men.•The most common racial or ethnic pairing among newlywed intermarried couples is a Hispanic person married to a white person (42 percent).

It's a small example of issues interracial couples still face, even 50 years after mixed marriages became legal nationwide. Virginia case — the subject of the recent film "Loving" — that the U. Supreme Court ruled that state bans on interracial marriage were unconstitutional.

Now a new analysis of census data by the Pew Research Center has found that the percentage of interracial or interethnic newlyweds in the U. rose from 3 percent since the Loving case to 17 in 2015.

Some of her biracial friends had much worse experiences, she said, having their hair cut off or being beaten up.

Some had grandparents or other family members who disowned them.

And Americans have become more accepting of marriages of different races or ethnicities.