Since the late 1970s, the Christian right has been a notable force in both the Republican party and American politics when Baptist pastor Jerry Falwell and other Christian leaders began to urge conservative Christians to involve themselves in the political process.

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Ballmer also pointed out a 2014 Politico article that in 1968, a symposium sponsored by the Christian Medical Society and Christianity Today, which was the flagship magazine evangelicals at the time, encouraged "individual health, family welfare, and social responsibility" as justifications for abortion and that in 1971, delegates to the Southern Baptist Convention in St.

Louis, Missouri, passed a resolution encouraging "Southern Baptists to work for legislation that will allow the possibility of abortion under such conditions as rape, incest, clear evidence of severe fetal deformity, and carefully ascertained evidence of the likelihood of damage to the emotional, mental, and physical health of the mother." Much of the Christian right's power within the American political system is attributed to their extraordinary turnout rate at the polls.

Christian right or religious right is a term used mainly in the United States to label conservative Christian political factions that are characterized by their strong support of socially conservative policies.

Christian conservatives principally seek to apply their understanding of the teachings of Christianity to politics and to public policy by proclaiming the value of those teachings or by seeking to use those teachings to influence law and public policy.

Williams argues in God's Own Party that it had actually been involved in politics for most of the twentieth century.

He also notes that the Christian right had previously been in alliance with the Republican Party in the 1940s through 1960s on matters such as opposition to communism and defending "a Protestant-based moral order." The alienation of Southern Democrats from the Democratic Party contributed to the rise of the right, as the counterculture of the 1960s provoked fear of social disintegration. President Jimmy Carter received the support of the Christian right largely because of his much-acclaimed religious conversion.

The voters that coexist in the Christian right are also highly motivated and driven to get out a viewpoint on issues they care about.

As well as high voter turnout, they can be counted on to attend political events, knock on doors and distribute literature.

Although the term "Christian right" is most commonly associated with politics in the United States, similar Christian conservative groups can be found in the political cultures of other Christian-majority nations. Green of the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life states that Jerry Falwell used the label religious right to describe himself.

Gary Schneeberger, vice president of media and public relations for Focus on the Family, states that "[t]erms like 'religious right' have been traditionally used in a pejorative way to suggest extremism.

In addition, as the Democratic Party became identified with a pro-choice position on abortion and with nontraditional societal values, social conservatives joined the Republican Party in increasing numbers. However, Carter's spiritual transformation did not compensate for his liberal policies in the minds of Christian conservatives, as reflected in Jerry Falwell's criticism that "Americans have literally stood by and watched as godless, spineless leaders have brought our nation floundering to the brink of death." The contemporary Christian right organized in reaction to a series of United States Supreme Court decisions, most notably Bob Jones University v. United States, which challenged the tax-exempt status of schools that discriminated against blacks.