New Scientist currently contains the following sections: Leader, News (Upfront), Technology, Opinion (interviews, point-of-view articles and letters), Features (including cover article), Culture Lab (book and event reviews), Feedback (humour), The Last Word (questions and answers) and Jobs & Careers. There are 51 issues a year; with a Christmas and New Year double issue.

The double issue in 2014 was the 3,000th edition of the magazine.

The law of cross-cutting relationships: anything that cuts across layers of rock is younger than the rocks that it has intruded into. Vocabulary Sequence Puzzles: Sequence 1 Sequence 2 Sequence 3 Sequences 1, 2 & 3 on one sheet Sequence 4 Sequence 5 Sequence 6 Sequence 7 Relative Dating Craters (see PPT to the right for answers) Worksheet on Radio Dating DBQ on Dinosaurs DBQ on The Natural History of LI DBQ on Magnetic Pole Reversals All three layers of rock (limestone, sandstone, shale) were made, then the volcano formed.

Reed retained the magazine when it sold most of its consumer titles in a management buyout to what is now IPC Media.

Throughout most of its history, New Scientist has published cartoons as light relief and comment on the news, with contributions from such long-time regular contributors as Mike Peyton and David Austin.

The Grimbledon Down comic strip, by the renowned cartoonist Bill Tidy, appeared from 1970 to 1994.

Ariadne, which later moved to Nature, commented weekly on the lighter side of science and technology, with the plausible but impractical humorous inventions of (fictitious) inventor Daedalus, often developed by the (fictitious) DREADCO corporation.

Life begins as single cells about 3.5 Billion Years ago. Most of the life that has evolved (99.9%) has become extinct.

Ex.: Cro-Magnon Man is extinct because they evolved into modern Homo-sapiens.

Something happens to uplift the area: folding faulting, etc.

Erosion wears away the uppermost layers Area submerges and deposition begins again. The almost vertical layers on the bottom formed first.

Photo by Phil Medina Volcanic time markers - a layer of volcanic dust covering layers.