“As a person who’s always been complimented on [my] ‘stunning beauty’ …I’d been searching for a ‘hot’ guy to match the label I had always been given,” says Young.

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When it came to dating in New York as a 30-something executive in private equity, Dan Rochkind had no problem snagging the city’s most beautiful women.

“I could have [anyone] I wanted,” says Rochkind, now 40 and an Upper East Sider with a muscular build and a full head of hair.

In one part, the researchers looked at the top 20 actresses on IMDb and found that they tend to have rocky marriages.

In another, women were asked to judge the attractiveness of 238 men based on their high school yearbook photos from 30 years ago.

Chitre, an environmental lawyer and the founder of Priyamvada Sustainability Consulting, considers herself “a 9 or a 10,” but she says she’s done with gorgeous guys.

Now, she’s more interested in “superballer” men with high-paying careers.

“Eventually, I was dreading getting dinner with them because they couldn’t carry a conversation.” According to new research, Rochkind’s ideas about sexy bikini babes are correct.

A multipart study from Harvard University, University of La Verne and Santa Clara University researchers found that beautiful people are more likely to be involved in unstable relationships.

“When men get to a certain age, they realize that it’s important to meet a life partner that they connect with,” she says.

“Looks fade.” Some great-looking people say they’re given a bad rap unfairly.

“But after a date or two, they’ll have problems hanging out with you and then will ghost.” Last year, she stopped putting looks at the top of her dating criteria on Bumble, instead opting for guys who traveled a lot and were “make the most out of their lives” types.