The essay will be refined further in future depending upon any new findings and conclusions that may emerge. Hinduism, unlike some other faiths, does not regard sexual desire as evil or impure.

The scope for premarital sex was virtually absent in Brahmana families as their lives were guided by the law books and strict moral conduct.

However, we cannot say the same about the princely families, feudal lords, land owning communities, lower castes, and people who were outcastes or lived in the forests.

The Hindu law books are consistent in using this interpretation as the standard to determine the lawfulness or unlawfulness of human conduct.

Hence, you will find in them approval for certain practices, which present day society may not appreciate.

by Jayaram VThis article presents a historical analysis of premarital sex, caste distinctions, and sexual mores of ancient Hindu communities in the context of changing traditional values among the youth and the new social challenges that may impact Hindu society. Hence it may be revised further if research brings out new information.

The problem with Hinduism is that you can argue from every angle and support different standpoints, depending upon how you may view them.

However, as in all other matters in Hinduism, intention is important to determine whether the sexual conduct of a person is lawful (dharma) or unlawful (adharma) and whether the sexual desire is pursued for the right ends.

If a person pursues it purely for pleasure and selfish enjoyment, it is considered evil and unlawful.

One such complex issue about which there can be divergent opinions and multiple realities in Hinduism is its stand with regard to premarital sex.

In the following discussion we will examine this subject and see whether it was practiced at all in ancient India.

These communities enjoyed considerable freedom, especially if they were not subject to Vedic morality or traditional Vedic laws.