The fairies, “Sive” in Irish, transformed her into a bird but at times she was able to be a woman again and conceived Cuchulainn with the sun-god Lugh.DESCRIPTION: The most beautiful woman in ancient Ireland, she was bethrothed to the High King Conchobhar Mac Nessa but she fell in love with his nephew Naoise.

irish dating and wedding traditions-5irish dating and wedding traditions-66irish dating and wedding traditions-42

DESCRIPTION: From the Gaelic cara the diminutive -in meaning “little friend or little beloved.” Caireann Chasdubh (“Cairenn of the Dark Curly Hair”) was the mother of the legendary warrior Niall of the Nine Hostages (read the legend) and thus was the maternal ancestor of the high kings of Ireland. In a time of famine the Devil offers food to the starving poor in exchange for their souls.

But Cathleen convinces Satan to take her soul instead.

DESCRIPTION: Ancient Irish name from the noun aine that means “splendor, radiance, brilliance.” Aine is connected with fruitfulness and prosperity.

The queen of the Munster fairies was called Aine as was one of the wives of Fionn Mac Cool (read the legend).

DESCRIPTION: The river Clody runs through County Tipperary and County Wexford and like most Irish rivers is named for a local female deity.

Rivers become places for prayer and Clodagh is a popular name in this part of the country.

DESCRIPTION: From clodhna meaning “shapely.” Cliodhna had three magical birds that could sing the sick to sleep and cure them.

In the tale of “Cliodhna’s Wave” she falls in love with a mortal, “Keevan of the Curling Locks,” and leaves Tir-Na-Nog (“Land of Eternal Youth”) (read the legend) with him but when he goes off to hunt, leaving her on the beach, she is swept to sea by a great wave, leaving her lover desolate.

DESCRIPTION: The feminine form of Ciaran, from the Irish ciar meaning “dark” and implies “dark hair and brown eyes.” St.

Ciara was a distinguished seventh-century figure who established a monastery at Kilkeary in County Tipperary.

The main female deity of the Celts, Brigid made the land fruitful and animals multiply, she blessed poets and blacksmiths. Brigid of Kildare carried her powers into the Christian era. DESCRIPTION: Though rooted in bronach “sad, sorrowful” St.