Golden Larnax (Chrysi Larnaka) (with the Sun of Vergina on the lid) that contains the remains (bones) from the burial of King Philip II of Macedonia and the royal golden wreath.

Formerly located at the Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, since 1997) displayed in the underground museum of Vergina, inside the Great Tumulus.

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359 BC – 25 December, 317 BC) reigned as king of Macedonia from after 11 June 323 BC until his death.

He was a son of King Philip II of Macedon by Philinna of Larissa, and thus an elder half-brother of Alexander the Great.

In 1977, important excavations were made near Vergina leading to the discovery of a two-chambered royal tomb, with an almost perfectly preserved male skeleton.

Manolis Andronikos, the chief archaeologist at the site, along with a number of other archaeologists, decided it was the skeleton of Philip II, but others have disputed this attribution and instead proposed it to be the remains of Philip Arrhidaeus.

That same year, Polyperchon and Olympias allied with her cousin, Aeacides, king of Epirus, and invaded Macedonia.

The Macedonian troops refused to fight Olympias, the mother of Alexander.

Arrhidaeus is also a main character in Annabel Lyon's novel The Golden Mean.

In it, the young Arrhidaeus is tutored by Aristotle while he also mentors his younger half-brother, the future Alexander the Great.

Alexander, who is initially disgusted with his brother's inferior intellect, learns to love him before he sets out to conquer the world.

In the Japanese fiction manga Historie, he was shown as an intellectually disabled young child that became happy when Eumenes made him a toy chariot and became sad when Alexander the Great destroyed his toy.

This move was an obvious affront to the regent, whom Cynane had completely bypassed, and to prevent the marriage, Perdiccas sent his brother, Alcetas, to kill Cynane. An agreement was made at Triparadisus in Syria in 320 BC.