If someone doesn’t “match” with me (online or in real life), it doesn’t mean I’m less valuable.

By getting rid of the potential to date people other people don’t find attractive, but we do, we’re increasing the competition around dating.

Priceonomics explain that if we’re all dating strangers, we’ll all be competing for physically attractive people and settling for those equal to us, rather than choosing people we personally find attractive after getting to know them (which would be less competitive, as other people might not appreciate their greatness).

I have pock-marked skin, hooded eyes, and a bulbous nose.

My voice is deep, which apparently makes me less desirable to men.

Society tells them they’re beautiful and they’re mad at Tinder and Ok Cupid for not providing better prospects. I’m the average-looking sidekick, “the one who online dates,” and it’s my fault they aren’t having a better time.

My best friend, who looks like the racially ambiguous lovechild of Brad Pitt and Pocahontas, waves her phone at me in righteous indignation. Several of my “classically attractive” friends are pissed.

The consequence of unchecked privilege — racial, gender, economic or beauty — is entitlement.

But, a side effect of being sidelined is an opportunity for ingenuity and grace.

Previous research has found that couples who met through the context of dating were more likely to be equally attractive than couples who were friends first – in the latter scenario, people rated as, for example, a three out of ten ended up marrying a seven out of ten. When we online date, all the people we end up talking to are those we’ve met in the context of dating.