Writing a test is also the best way for you yourself to figure out if you really understand the issue you think you have with sax-js.

sax parser not validating-30

He does not need to create any data structure of his own.

What he needs to do is to first modify the DOM tree (i.e., set value to the 'grade' node) and then save the whole modified tree.

The validator will report fatal errors, non-fatal errors and warnings.

If the XSD is publicly available using HTTP and referenced through a "schema Location" or "no Namespace Schema Location", then the validator will pick it up and it doesn't need to be specified/uploaded.

What's more, it runs faster and is easier to learn than DOMParser because its API is really simple.

But from the functionality point of view, it provides less functions which mean that the users themselves have to take care of more, such as creating their own data structures. I think the answer really depends on the characteristics of your application. ): Assume that an instructor has an XML document containing all the personal information of the students as well as the points his students made in his class, and he is now assigning final grades for the students using an application.

What he probably need to do in his application, is first to look through all the students' points and compute the average, and then look through the document again and assign the final grade to each student by comparing the points he earned to the class average.

If, however, the instructor adopts such a grading policy that the students who got 90 points or more, are assigned A's and the others are assigned B's, then probably he'd better use a SAX parser.

For example, a DOMParser is rich in functionality (because it creates a DOM tree in memory and allows you to access any part of the document repeatedly and allows you to modify the DOM tree), but it is space inefficient when the document is huge, and it takes a little bit long to learn how to work with it.