— Trent B., a Pennsylvania registrant convicted of streaking While federal law requires states to register former offenders convicted of certain offenses, it does not limit states’ authority to increase the number of offenses that trigger registration or the duration of the requirement to register. Most people assume that a registered sex offender is someone who has sexually abused a child or engaged in a violent sexual assault of an adult. Preston Street Baltimore, MD 21201 Phone: ( Shirley Pandolfi, MPH Division Director, Office Against Interpersonal Violence Mississippi State Department of Health 715 S. Suite 102 Ridgeland, Mississippi 39157 Phone: (601) 206-1553 Email: [email protected] Miriam Naiman-Sessions, Ph D Women’s and Men’s Health Section Supervisor Family and Community Health Bureau Public Health and Safety Division Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services 1400 Broadway Cogswell Building Helena, Montana 59620 Phone: ( Alison M.

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A review of state sex offender registration laws by Human Rights Watch reveals that states require individuals to register as sex offenders even when their conduct did not involve coercion or violence, and may have had little or no connection to sex.

For example: Oklahoma law treats any type of public exposure as a sex offense that triggers 10 years on the sex offender registry, even if the offender had no sexual or lascivious motivation or intent at the time he or she exposed him- or herself.

The Act also sets the frequency with which a former offender must update registry information: Tier I sex offenders must do so every year; Tier II sex offenders must do so every six months; and Tier III offenders must do so every three months.

A registrant must not only register with local law enforcement in the jurisdiction where he or she resides, but must also register in the jurisdiction where he or she is employed or and goes to school.

In 1994 the US Congress passed the Jacob Wetterling Crimes against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, named after an 11-year-old boy who was abducted at gunpoint while riding his bike near his home. 272, § 35A; Michigan, MCLS § 28.723, 28.722, 750.520e; Minnesota, Minn.

Under the legislation, people convicted of sexual abuse of children or sexually violent crimes against adults were required to register their current addresses with local law enforcement for 10 years following their release into the community. The only reason I am considered a sex offender is because I committed an offense that triggers registration. In any other context, my crime would never be considered a sex offense, and I would not be considered a threat to society. I think it makes sense that the police have the information they need to monitor my whereabouts. I committed a crime, and I accept that consequence. Indeed, at least some registrants convicted of sexually violent crimes agree that registering with local law enforcement makes sense. — Paul G., convicted in 1994 of adult rape, released from prison in 1995 If sex offender registries were limited to previously convicted sex offenders who had committed sexually violent crimes or sex crimes against children and who have been individually assessed as presenting a high or medium risk of committing similar crimes again, registration might help protect the public. One of the goals of the Act was to create more uniformity among state registration schemes, to avoid some of the confusion as to registration requirements when registrants moved to different states.