The terms used to refer to Native Americans are controversial; according to a 1995 US Census Bureau set of home interviews, most of the respondents with an expressed preference refer to themselves as American Indians or Indians.In the last 500 years, Afro-Eurasian migration to the Americas has led to centuries of conflict and adjustment between Old and New World societies.They have organized and been recognized as tribes since the late 20th century by several states and, in some cases, by the federal government.

Expansion of European-American populations after the American Revolution resulted in increasing pressure on Native American lands, warfare between the groups, and rising tensions. Government officials thought that by decreasing the conflict between the groups, they could also help the Indians survive.

Remnant groups have descendants living throughout the South.

Their villages were constructed with large multi-family dwellings, used seasonally.

People did not live there year round, but for the summer to hunt and fish, and to gather food supplies for the winter.

The Clovis culture ranged over much of North America and also appeared in South America.

The culture is identified by the distinctive Clovis point, a flaked flint spear-point with a notched flute, by which it was inserted into a shaft.They settled first around present-day Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, from where they migrated into Alaska and northern Canada, south along the Pacific Coast, and into the interior.They were the earliest ancestors of the Athabascan- speaking peoples, including the present-day and historical Navajo and Apache.The big-game hunting culture labeled as the Clovis culture is primarily identified with its production of fluted projectile points.The culture received its name from artifacts found near Clovis, New Mexico; the first evidence of this tool complex was excavated in 1932.Most of the written historical record about Native Americans was made by Europeans after their immigration to the Americas.