Although he never completed the MA degree, his exposure to clinical psychology explains his lifelong focus on process and developmental stages.Bill was swept-up by the Black Consciousness Movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

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Bill entered Cornell as a psychologist, and after 20 years of immersion in interdisciplinary Black Studies, left the Africana Center transformed into a Cultural Psychologist. Cross wrote Shades of Black, which voiced his challenge to the Black Self-Hatred thesis, presented a major revision of the original Negro-to-Black Identity Change Model, and outlined a two-factor theory of self-concept structure (SC = PI RGO).

In 1994, he left Cornell to take a position at Pennsylvania State University, where his career was revitalized.

For over 20 years, Vandiver has been the primary researcher and statistician in the creation and validation of the Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS). William Cross originally developed the theory behind the CRIS, Nigrescence theory, in 1971.

The CRIS was the first and currently only racial identity measure for African Americans.

Vandiver is a prolific researcher who has made significant contributions to research related to ethnic minority populations.

She has made a lasting impact on the field of psychology and counseling, and is a very deserving honoree for the 2017 Distinguished Career Contribution to Research award from Division 45, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race of APA.

Beverly Vandiver, Professor Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology in the College of Education and Human Development, will be awarded the 2017 Distinguished Career Contribution to Research award from Division 45, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race of the American Psychological Association (APA).

The award honors the contributions of a senior person in the field of psychology who has made significant contributions in research related to ethnic minority populations.

Together they designed, tested and validated the Cross-Racial-Identity-Scale [CRIS], one of the most important and exemplary measures used by Division 45 scholars.